Rolling along

The Padres’ streak continues as they pulled off a dramatic 7-5 win over the Giants last night. The Friars have now won five straight and 13 of their last 19. Over that 19-game stretch, the Padres are outscoring their opponents 118-78, averaging 6.2 runs/game while hitting .292 with a .352 OBP and .466 SLG.

Due to the offensive surge, the Padres now rank among the league leaders in several offensive categories since the All-Star break, including runs scored (2nd), hits (4th), doubles (6th), triples (1st) and batting average (6th). They are 20-18 since the break, one of just six NL clubs to play over .500 ball since the Midsummer Classic.

Now, it’s time to get a little nerdy on you…

Keep in mind that these are just numbers and obviously what happens on the field day-to-day rightfully determines a team’s win-loss record. I point this out JUST FOR FUN.

Despite the Padres’ record, the club has actually outscored their opponents 503-497 this season. They join the Diamondbacks as the only two NL West teams to score more runs than they have allowed in 2011. In fact, according to baseball-reference.com, the Padres’ Pythagorean win-loss record is 66-64, tops in the NL West (ARI 65-64; COL 65-65; LAD 62-66; SF 62-67).

Again, this is JUST FOR FUN. For more information on what exactly a Pythagorean winning percentage is, here is the explanation straight from baseball-reference.com (might want to brush up on your order of operations first):

“Pythagorean winning percentage is an estimate of a team’s winning percentage given their runs scored and runs allowed. Developed by Bill James, it can tell you when teams were a bit lucky or unlucky. It is calculated by

(Runs Scored)^1.83/[(Runs Scored)^1.83 + (Runs Allowed)^1.83]

The traditional formula uses an exponent of two, but this has proven to be a little more accurate.”

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